Multitasking: The Opposite of Mindfulness

juggler

Whenever the word multitasking is used, there is often a positive connotation associated with it. The fact that I can prepare dinner and chat with a friend on the phone while simultaneously ordering a book on Amazon is typically perceived to be a good thing. And so the assumption is that I should be happy that I am a good multitasker. Since the ability to multitask is viewed as such a valuable asset, it is not uncommon to find people referring to their multitasking skills on their CVs and in job interviews.

Despite the positive connotations associated with multitasking, being a multitasker is something that I consciously avoid. Attempting to juggle multiple tasks at once takes us away from the present moment, which is one of the core principles of mindfulness. Focusing on multiple tasks in a single moment creates a feeling of being scattered and pulled in several different directions. When we say no to multitasking, we allow ourselves to fully complete a task before moving on to the next. In so doing, we remain completely present in that moment and as a result, we end up completing tasks with greater ease and fewer accidents! It can also bring greater focus and enjoyment to what we are doing.

So there is a lot to gain in saying no to multitasking and there are several small action steps we can put into place to help overcome the urge to multitask. For instance, switching off our phones when we are working, designating set time periods in each day to check email, and also setting clearer boundaries between working hours and relaxation time. While these may seem like little things, they can all yield important results in helping us to stay in the present moment.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s