Navigating Job Applications

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Applying for jobs in the midst of completing your PhD can feel very overwhelming. Students are frequently told how competitive the job market is. As early as the first year of a PhD, I often hear students starting to worry: ‘what if I don’t find a job?’ When left unchecked, this fear can become all-consuming and start to impede progress on the PhD itself.

My advice to students is to set aside one hour per week and go to a space where they don’t do their regular PhD work, such as a cafe in their neighbourhood. I ask them to bring along a notebook or journal specifically devoted to their job search. During that time and that time alone, they do a broad search of jobs they come across, note them down in the book and keep track of when the application is due. After the hour, I ask them to close their job search journal and leave that space.

Having this time carved out, and conducting their search in a separate space to their normal working environment helps to set some important boundaries. It also allows them to get excited about the prospect of finding a job without inhibiting their work and limits the amount of worried energy that gets expended on this task.

If you are starting to think about applying for jobs, try this technique for the next few weeks and see if it helps make the job search feel more manageable.

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Once you’ve narrowed down a few prospective jobs to apply for, here are a few additional tips to keep in mind.

  • When you find a position that you’d like to apply for, try not to become overly attached to it. The best way to do this is to zoom out and allow yourself to see that there are other possibilities beyond that one job. If you think you need something in order to be happy, it’s a sign you are overly attached to it.

 

  • Give up the mentality of lack and scarcity – the idea that there aren’t enough jobs, publication opportunities or funding to go around. While this mindset is very common in academia, it breeds a lot of anxiety and puts unnecessary pressure on you.

 

  • When you apply for something give it your best shot but remember that you only control 50% of the process. The other 50% is beyond your control, as there may be factors behind the scenes that you aren’t even aware of. All you can do is work on your half of the equation and let go of trying to control the other half.

 

  • Despite the image that most people project of themselves, it takes time to land the ideal job. Even the strongest candidates will encounter their fair share of rejection letters over time. Instead of setting unrealistic expectations for yourself and comparing yourself to others, remind yourself that patience is a virtue when it comes to navigating job applications.

 

  • Getting to the interview stage is a success in its own right and should be celebrated. If you ever feel like you screwed up an interview or an application, remember that this is a learning process. Interview skills are something you can improve, so try and treat it as a learning experience.

 

  • Whatever setbacks you encounter in applying for jobs, these do not need to define you unless you allow them to. If things don’t work out as you hoped in relation to a specific job, remember that there could be something better out there for you.

 

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